About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CNNW 20
CSPAN 19
CSPAN2 15
MSNBCW 15
ALJAZAM 13
FBC 6
KQED (PBS) 5
CNBC 4
COM 4
LINKTV 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 130
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)
with compliance departments and upstarts with energy and ideas. this status inequality demands our attention. last week's bipartisan passage of the unfunded mandate's transparency and information act is a good start, but much more must be done. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the chair will receive message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: mr. secretary. the secretary: i am directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina eek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, transitioning from military to civilian life can be challenging for our veterans. the skill sets learned while serving in the armed forces are highly valued and confidence is extraordinary of veterans who have proven work ethic.
and the guy that's supplying the energy for the united states? >> host: where did you read they pay for leasing of the land and taxes? >> caller: that's just on the internet. >> host: zachary goldfarb, the oil companies and gas company to pay taxes and they do have to pay the federal government to lease these lands. >> guest: that's right. the reason the government thinks is there is its multiple. first, the government belief these are public lands in many cases and some some of the benefits of that oil and gas should spread the people in those committees and around the country and not just into the pockets of the company. secondly, there is enforcement, environmental regulations in terms of government oversight when you do natural resource billing and exploration in the united states to protect in private, natural habitats and so forth. that needs to be paid for as well. i think the funds and licensing fees go to that support. >> host: freelancer on twitter, how much debt did bush leave? i read 11.5 trillion spent in eight years and the gop act like they have nothing to do with the
will respond? the only country willing to bail out is russia the only country that determines the energy surplus so i think russia does have a decision making power. georgia would have been easy. i think he waits to play for the whole game because by made the ukrainians will be bankrupt or will be broke can you imagine saying vote for me? i want to raise your taxes and force the anti-corruption austerity budget. the russians know they fall in their lap. >> the signals that are sent to russia russian defense ministers saying russia is now planning the permanent military presence outside russia's borders including vietnam, cuba, venezuela, ni caragua singapore and other countries and back in november secretary kerry said the monroe doctrine is dead. did he just waved the flag for russian expansionism? >> that is one of many that the administration has been waving. as clap to america the monroe doctrine is not popular and tell it is needed then they want to know where the united states is of central and south america are very worried about russian participation adventurism and a return of r
that with ed royce. i think we need to take the fact that america in 2020 will be the leading world energy producer, so let's talk about that being used to be an offset to the russians because their energy is their weapon. if we're looking to make russia a pariah state, that's where the president needs to be talking. >> listen, i think there's a lot to be said for that. as you know i'm more of a clean energy guy but taking that away from russia, their monopoly in energy, is good. but republicans are missing an opportunity to look more bipartisan. >> congressman engel, i think what bothers republicans is how much the president and the administration seems to have empowered putin over the past few years. just to give you a couple of examples. russia controls the northern distribution network which is one of the main access points in afghanistan that our troops rely on to get supplies and food and water. putin controls that. putin is controlling our syria chemical weapons collection deal, which is a farce. putin is undermining our negotiations in iran. have we given him too much power? why ha
. it is a loan guarantee. it still needs approval by congress. it would help cover some of the energy costs in the ukraine, because they would be losing probably the energy subsidies they get from russia. they are also talking about sending technical advisors in a whole host of areas first to work with the central bank and finance ministry, also to train election monitors, there is the hope there could be an election in may in ukraine. and the hope is that the u.s. can train monitors to ensure that is a free and fair election. and they also want to send technical advisors to help ukraine identify and recover any stolen assets we have heard about president yanukovych and the oligark, spirit billions of dollars out of the country. the administration has been saying that it has a wide host of sanctions that it can consider. they would be done through presidential executive order. they have already taken some diplomatic steps. they have pulled back on preparations for the g-8 summit. they have canceled trade talks. and what they are talking about as far as further sanctions could be the freezin
to happen. but at the end of the day, the only options we have are to increase our own energy independence, put energy in a position where putin doesn't have access to the energy reserves and to the reknew that's he's had in the past. so whether this president does it or the next president does it, somebody has to do it. and i keep going back, shannon, you know, we survived jimmy carter, we're going to survive barack obama, but it will be incumbent on the next president to stop president obama. otherwise, neither will stop president putin. >> always good to see you. thanks so much. >> thank you, shannon. >>> the top democrat in the senate says the obamacare horror stories are live. that has some experiencing them first hand pretty fired up. >> i'm completely outraged. it's absolutely ridiculous. >> we're going debate the issue fair and balanced, of course, next. >>> another snowstorm spreading across the country gearing up to hit the east coast tonight. whether you want them or not, you need to know. [ female announcer ] a classic macaroni & cheese from stouffer's starts with freshly-made
are under way. they can develop alternative energy supplies, including fracking. including as the united states becomes an energy exporter, there are alternative sources there in the future and sources -- the inauguration of of the new pipeline project from the caspian sea which will be a new route for gas supplies into europe, not passing through russia, not from russia. this infrastructure will take time to develop but it is important to do so. the world is becoming increasingly unstable. this latest example to world peace is the classic case in my view. will the foreign secretary array with me -- agree with me that our country must rethink the funding of our armed forces to make sure we have the ships, the navy, the air force to me potential threats in the future. i am not hinting we should go to war on this case but it is a reminder we need to keep our defenses up. in an unstable world we do need to keep up our defenses, that is right. that is why this country is investing in some very sophisticated military projects for the future. as twotain the spending percent of our gdp on defen
the world. >>ali, shock wave to the energy prices? >> yes, oil prices, that is global, that rose 2%, $105s a barrel now and we are going to feel that at the pumps and the price natural gas in germany and uk jumped 10%. germany is an industrial power house and depends on natural gas for electricity and call coming from russia, 40% of the the natural gas coming from russia through the ukraine and that is not good news. this is not affecting u.s. natural gas. we don't want to see russia pushing europe back into a recession because we all know that hitting us all. >> what other aspects are you looking at? >> i am looking at a guy that bidding plumbing and manufacturing parts and he exports them and invests in a factory operation in crimea, and he's doing this for a while and i am going to talk to him about affecting his business so we are connected. >> thank you, ali and thank you. we have a response to the ukrainian crisis on social media. >> ukrainians are going online and expressing their feelings on what is happening in their crime. a woman is saying she wants peace, not war and take a loo
energy found in peanuts? caramel works. payday. crunchy, roasted peanuts and soft, delicious caramel come together to give you sweet energy. payday. fill up and go. an entirely new menu created with your busy schedule in mind. pronto lunch starting at $6.99. handmade italian sandwiches, flatbreads, and our signature soup and salad. starting at $6.99. and all served "pronto!" at olive garden. yo,move fast fruit flavor,fe, watermelon, blue razz green apple. your taste buds dancing. it's the jolly rancher, we make it happen. untamed fruit flavor. jolly rancher. [cheers and applause] >> jon: welcome back. my guest tonight a theoretical physicist, best selling author his new book is called the future of the mind. scientific question to understand, enhans and em -- enhance and empower the mind. please welcome to the program michio kaku. [cheers and applause] >> thanks. >> jon: how are you? >> very good. very good. >> jon: thank you for being here. >> glad to be on. >> jon: the future of the mind. this is -- i think, a subject which is so difficult for us to comprehend and it -- you find yoursel
and energy that that private company has brought to the afghan media scene -- more about that in a minute. they are not the only ones. there are something like 75 television stations and 175 radio stations. either normal sleeve vigorous, varied conversation going on on the airways and in afghanistan. largest but be the it is one of many. that is a notable piece of media landscape. the third thing is as an embassy thecial i went around country and often visited tiny in villages and small towns around afghanistan. there are a lot of them. going to a one-room fm station and a small town but does not have to much going for it and you find young people at the microphone finding some way to get a little bit and music on with a basic tape recorder. in many cases the stations were help ofby locals with ngos, which is resented by some of interviews. while they run some local -- ent, maybe have another green shoot and a strong one, an important one. a varied source of strength for afghanistan going forward. we are here in this panel to discuss what i think is one of the most important advances over
is exceptionally weak in ukraine. and what's more, the eu imports most of its energy from russia, which is a top oil producer. should putin take the risk and turn off the taps, as he did with ukraine in 2009 and in 2006, it could spell disaster for europe and, perhaps, the u.s. as the "new republic" notes, "any supply shocks in europe that send prices higher will have ripple effects that raise gas prices in the united states." fiona hill is an expert on russia and eurasian affairs at the brookings institution. fiona, thanks for being here. let's start with that question. you do have a lot of criticism of the president saying that he needs to take stronger action. what conceivable stronger action could be taken? >> well, the problem is, as you've just laid out, that the strong action that the president can take really is very dependent on being in lock step with our european allies. the real impact of any sanctions would only be felt on russia if the eu and other key allies are with us in the way that we are all acting together in the sanctions against iran and our dispute over iran's nuclear pro
. why? because rush ha is blackmailing europe over energy. supplies a third of oil and natural gas to the eu. the more oil and natural gas the u.s.a. and canada can produce and distribute, the weaker russia becomes on the world stage i fervently hope president obama understands that finally, there is barack obama's legacy. hear's a satirical picture posted on fox nation showing the contrasting styles of putin and obama. obviously the russian leader sees himself as macho man. the president sees himself as a renaissance man who wants to accommodate. but there is no accommodating putin. and if the u.s.a. looks weak on this one, believe me, we'll pay a heavy price. as will the president's historical reputation. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight reaction joining us from boston fox news military analyst colonel david hunt and -- am i making mistakes here, mr. whiten? >> no, i don't think so. i would add a few other things to the list. you know, we can be specific with building -- helping central europe get free of russian energy. it's russian energy that's been used agai
, the reality is that russia has a lot of nuclear weapons. their economy is modest except for energy, and they're not a great power, but they have the ability to pick them off one at a time. their neighbors abroad, they can do that, they went into georgia as you'll recall. ukraine is enormously important to the world. and the idea that we would have created an environment that is hospitable is outrageous. it's not just putin, it's going to be the people's republic of china. even if it's not in cahoots with put putin. >> it seems like the president and the secretary of state keep lecturing putin, that they have a 19th century mentality, this is the 21st century. he made a speech where -- in which he says the great power conflict is a thing of the past. i want to ask you about these words the president uttered many listen to this closely. >> those countries that are large like russia or china, we have the kind of relationship with them we're not getting into conflicts of that sort at least over the last several decades, there's been a recognition that neither country benefits from that kind of g
-up. 5.5 million euros per day. russia is a major exporter of energy to europe and a lot of those pipelines go through ukraine. this is a fear premium put into the price of energy and it is affecting our everyday prices. charles: it has applications to the idea this will be east-west, for tat economic sanctions. to a large degree europe needs that oil. sandra: this is also being seen as an opportunity for the united states. the reopen of the discussion of the keystone pipeline, more exports of liquefied natural gas. this could be an opportunity for the united states. charles: oil was already breaking out before this crisis. anything else going on beneath the surface other than the headlines? sandra: it is a safe haven buying. people want to own something other than equities because they see those as the riskiest assets to own right now. charles: a huge move up $31, what is it? gold has one of the roughest years ever last year, now all of a sudden it is seen as a safe haven, why is it a safe haven? sandra: everybody institutionally are piling on. the most bullish they have been on
is power... focus is life... and 5-hour energy is focus. with over 100,000 miles. most vehicles on the road that's the power of german engineering. e. [cheers and applause] jorchg ladies and. >> jon: ladies and gentlemen, i'm so excited. it's time once again to check in on our neighbors to the south. no not -- [laughter] we're not doing a story on the 51st food market, not our literal neighbors to the south. they do have a terrific turkey sandwich. my point is this, thank you. mexico. [ laughter ] after more than a decade a brutal war with massive drug cartels has been a defining fact of life and last weekend a break. >> the capture of one of most wanted criminals on the planet who headed the most powerful drug operation in the world. mexican drug lord joaquin guzman known as el chapo has been captured ending a 13-year long manhunt. >> jon: el chapo got el popped-o. it translated to either a short stout person or corn porridge. [laughter] which kind of a weird name for a tough game. let me introduce you to my gang. you know me corn porridge. over in the corner jimmy oatmeal, gary gruel. thi
bilateral and multilateral interactions. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? the economic situation in russia may be more marvel to economic pressures than most -- may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he is to suffer under, willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. what is the point of all this? putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. many russians believe that crimea is russian territory. the people there identify as russian and crimea should always be a part of russia. there is a nationalistic element , a domestic, political element. has aly, putin long-standing policy of projecting russian power. some will say it is an effort to reconstitute the soviet bloc. i t
is the number one supplier of energy to ukraine is russia. the number one debt is to russia. the president's proposing the american taxpayers send foreign aid to ukraine which will immediately go to russia. which strikes me as putin saying fine he'll be happy to take the taxpayers' money. >> that's nonsense. first of all, congress, by the way, is compared to when you're there, they're never there. they're out all the time, they can't get anything done. he can't authorize any money through the imf unless the congress adopts it. that's what he's trying to say. by the way, if you're talking about, you know, putin was going to lend money to ukraine. he lent them 3 billion which he's not going to get back. if you want to take over ukraine, you're taking over a bankrupt country. the idea that somehow another -- by saying we want to give the money, yeah, i think we ought to help them get out of bankruptcy just like general motors or something. >> but won't that money -- won't a large part of the money go directly to russia? >> no, it won't go to the russians. yanukovych who was their guy, he got
,hose particularly energy. this has been about for the russian economy. the currency has fallen. the stock market is down. there was a reaction to this that may affect putin's economy. but i mention one other thing? is this beautiful and large country called ukraine. suppose ukraine finally after failing in 2004 get it right -- democracy, gets rid of corruption, the economy is improving, and it is there of the border for russia. i think it makes him nervous if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia. if the sanctions fail? what do you do it the pressure with his he continues own ambitious ideas of expanding within his own borders and spears of influence? >> go back to georgia in nato. if you tried something like that ay with one area that has significant russian popularity -- population, he would be attacking nato. that would be an entirely different set of circumstances. i have no illusions that in the short term, we will be able to ambitions.tin's in the long term, we can curb those ambitions in many ways, b
? >> yes, some of them will work, there's no question about that. it's just a question of how much energy is going to be put into the device to get it to work. what's going to be the most energy efficient way to do this, because remember, we have to get the craft up there that's going to do the work, we have to give it capability to maneuver around in space. once the technology that's going to be used to remove something from orbit, one of the ideas of attaching a tether so it builds friction and pulls the object down is not such a bad idea, because it doesn't require a lot of material to do that. if you could just push something out of orbit, that might not be a bad idea, because it may not require a large energy budget to make that work. you keep the expenses down in energy and materials and get the job done, it's just that those methods are slow and there's a lot of material that needs to be cleaned up. if there was a faster way to do it, that might be better. >> boy, that's certainly a big problem. nasa's budget was just announced or at least what they're hoping for the budget the nex
the energy situation. thank god, the weather is going to get warmer soon. he has those levers. he has an overwhelming military capability. there are many, many things, but particularly energy. but, you know, this has been bad for the russian economy. the value of their currency has fallen, the stock market is down. there is a negative reaction to this, too, that may effect putin's economy. and could i mention one other aspect of this is putin also sees -- here's this beautiful and large and magnificent country called ukraine. suppose ukraine, finally, after failing in 2004, gets it right, democracy, gets rid of corruption, economy is improving, and it's right there on the border of russia. so i think it makes him very nervous, if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia, as you know, which is propped up by energy. >> charlie: should we revisit the question of georgia and nato? >> yes. i really believe that we should sponsor the inclusion of georgia into nato. every few weeks the russians move the fe
economic leverage over ukraine because of the supply of energy. he has some influence in western europe, which still gets 25% of their energy from russia. so i think he's sitting there thinking that, in fact, he probably holds the better hand here for whatever negotiation is to come. >> charlie: do you believe he holds the better hand? >> frankly, based on what i'm hearing out of western europe and the reluctance of the europeans to embrace tough sanctions, i think, at least right now, i think he does. >> charlie: so if the europeans are not willing to go forward with tough sanctions, we're in a bad place. >> i think we are. >> charlie: you also have suggested some of your fellow republicans should tone down their rhetoric. >> well, this is a serious crisis that the west is facing, and, you know, when i -- i spent most of my life in the government at a time when, during immediate crises, people came together and were supportive of the president basically with the old line that politics stopped at the water's edge. i think people, right now while the president is trying to get the allies
are all in talks with iran over its nuclear program. while they talk, energy companies are chomping at the bit to get back into theç islac republic. sanction-free. sharon epperson talking with two big companies now making plans to do just that. she joins us live in houston. hi, sharon. >> reporter: hi, sue. ceos of some of the major oil and gas companies in europe are really looking for investments overseas, including iran. i spoke to the ceo of totale in france, who said they are definitely interested in investing in iran under the right conditions. >> even on what we call the interim period, we might start discussing. we will not invest, we will not negotiate new terms until we can do it. >> reporter: the ceo of italy's eni was the first western oil company ceo to meet with iran's oil minister once that preliminary nuclear deal was reached last year at the end of last year. he says he applauds iran's decision to retool the terms of their business model and in terms of enticing more investment in iran's energy sector, but he says there are definitely some changes that need to be
a relatively modest economy with the exception of its energy capabilities and leverage. it's got a military that has a lot of nuclear weapons it's a conscript military. he is, today, punching way above his weight class, and the united states is punching way below ours. >> mr. secretary, thank you for talking to us, you bet. >> as the ukraine crisis gets worse even the mainstream media -- washington editorial saying president obama's foreign policy based on fantasy. former u.n. ambassador john bolton joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening, glad to be with you from london. >> yes. i don't mean to be heart beat on editorial. seems to be a departure when the "the washington post" comes out and uses the term fantasy at such an ominous time it's an accurate description of what's going on. the president's main problem is that he just doesn't care about america national security issues. he doesn't focus on it. he said back in the 2008 campaign that his priority was transforming american society. that's what he is up to. so, in 2008, nato made a terrible mistake when the europeans rejected our
,000,000,000 in energy subsidies to the ukraine because those subsidies are likely to be taken away because of an imf package. there is a real fear of what an imf loan package means, a structural adjustment package, huge cuts to the poorest in society to the sort we saw in greece and elsewhere, future unrest and the u.s. is quite a wear that when countries go down the road of imf loans, you can get even more unrest. another interesting thing about that energy subsidy is a lot of that money is going to end up in moscow because it's moscow who sells much of ukraine its fuel. in washington, they are quite a wear they are giving potentially a billion dollars to moscow. >> just how far is the u.s. supposed to go in supporting ukraine? at what point is it going to run up against opposition in congress? >> there is a lot of -- a lot of support for financial aid and financial loans to ukraine. however, the senate majority leader, harry reid said let's keep an idea on what europe wants. this is mainly a european issue. if europe isn't all for sanctions -- and they are not because they are scared of losing al
has baggage from the past. she was involved in the energy industry with her husband and some people say she was corrupt. so the problem with ukraine has always been corruption. it is a very corrupt country. has history of corruption dates back to the soviet union but continues since the demise of the soviet union. for that reason it maybe easierr russian puppets of, other puppets of the old soviet union to say, we need to go in there and we need russian troops to make sure that this country doesn't dissolve into chaos. gerri: that is obviously a possibility. let's bring in back ashley webster who is following the story closely. ashley, do you see conflict? do you see dissolution? what do you see in your crystal ball? >> this is a different cut one and as david said what are we calling this? is this an invasion? certainly appears that way but who are the troops in unidentified uniforms? as i said earlier there are those who speculate, everyone does that when she these events move at such a fast pace, private security firm that the kremlin uses from time to time and uses them to take
to alternative energy. we have that story covered. >> the big day at the supreme court. they determine the fate of shareholder class action worth $80 billion in 20 years. we are streaming on your smart phone and your tablet. all of our interviews are live and on-demand on apple tv. ♪ biggest package shipping company is making another investment in alternative fuel. we are talking ups. compositionange the of the ups fleet in the united states. we recently went inside ups. you say the vehicles run on a variety of fuels. >> they do a lot. they have hybrids, pure electrics, cng compressed natural gas -- they have propane. they have had propane up in canada. the news today, they will make a $70 million investment to buy 1000 propane trucks. they're going to install about 50 fueling stations at various ups stations. they are introducing this propane fleet in the u.s. this will replace trucks in role areas. rural areas. they will reduce the use of ofut 3.5 million gallons diesel and gasoline. >> the purpose -- saving money. >> they have a couple of initiatives. whethera company -- it's looking at th
and atmospheric administration, the department of energy, the environmental protection agency, the nuclear regulatory commission and the national institute of standards and technology. all said the same thing -- it's not their responsibility. >> one of our frustrations is our government hasn't taken this on as something we should sponsor in terms of our national interests. there is often a lot of finishing pointing going on and we hope in the long run we can make progress to find a home, as we call it. >> reporter: in the mean time, he is relying on foundation support and doing some crowd sourcing. >> all it takes is filling up one of these containers. >> reporter: he launched a web site and created these kits to make it easy for anyone to do some fieldwork. interested individuals and communities pay $550 for the fox, gather samples and ship them to woods hall for analysis. the data is shared online. so far donors have funded 33 sample sites. but how is the radiation affecting the creatures that live in the sea and ultimately the human beings who enjoy eating seafood? >> this one. at's ces
of reprocessing in order to, for example, provide domestic energy, nuclear energy plants. many countries in the world have nuclear energy. but only a handful actually process it themselves. most just decide to buy it already processed from abroad. we have agreements and we have arrangements with countries all over the planet that do that. only a handful actually retain the capacity to reprocess it or -- or -- or to enrich uranium or reprocess plutonium. when you see a country -- when you see a country announce that they are going to invest money, time and energy in developing a processing -- a reprocessing or an enrichment exaibilityd, that raises -- capability, that raises red flags and here's why. because while you only need a certain level of enrichment to be able to provide nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and a little bit of a higher level in order to be able to use it for medical isotopes, the exact same machines, the exact same facilities, the exact same scientists are the exact same runs that can also reprocess or enrich to an even higher level to use in a weapon. the story o
that all he is interested in is domestic energy for peaceful purposes. the problem is that's not what's happening. what's happening is that the united states, through the state department and this administration, i think de facto has already but if not are on the verge of agreeing to allow iran to keep in place its enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, and i'm going to explain to you why that's a problem. if that capability is still there, if they retain all the facilities necessary for enrichment and reprocessing, even if they agree to limit to to a certain level for now at any point in time in the future they can ratchet it back up and they can go on to develop a weapon. in fact, the design for a weapon is the easiest part unfortunately of all of this. the hardest part is reaching the technological capability to enrich uranium to a certain point so you can weaponize it. if you allow them to keep all the equipment, all the technology, all the scientists, all that infrastructure in place, then at any point in the future when they decide now it's time for a weapon, they can break o
program and washington said it should be allowed to produce energy. mr. obama will hold a similar meeting with the president in two weeks. orthodox jews were in west jerusalem over the weekend. they were protesting a law being debated in the israeli parliament with men to be drafted into military service and orthodox jews have been exempt and they want to keep it that way. >> it's important to tell the state of isreal that we are opposed to their political philosophies that we feel that the contribution that the elements of society are making will help the army and through our contributions and the religious spectrum we are arm and arm with the army, helping the state of israel. >> reporter: the new legislation is expected to pass in the next few weeks. ultra orthodox jews makeup 10% of israel's population. a california state lawmaker facing corruption charges says he is taking a paid leave of absence and he is accused of accepting about 100,000 in bribes including meals and golf games in exchange for his political influence. he is pleading not guilty. and he is the second california sta
have peaceful nuclear energy programs. they're doing this without spinning centrifuges, without enriching uranium, without operating heavy water facilities, and without conducting military nuclear research. you know why iran insists on doing all of these things that the other peaceful countries don't do? it's because iran doesn't want a peaceful nuclear program. iran wants a military nuclear program. i said it here once. i will say it here again. if it looks like a duck, if it walks like a duck, if it quacks like a duck, then what is it? well, it ain't a chicken. and it certainly not a dove. it is still a nuclear duck. [applause] unfortunatelily the leading powers of the world are talking about leading iran with the capability to enrich uranium. i hope they don't do that because that would be a grave error. it would leave iran as a threshold nuclear power. it would enable iran to rapidly develop nuclear weapons, at a time when the world's attention is focused elsewhere. and we see, as we speak, that that could happen. in one part of the world today, tomorrow in another part, may
ago where i felt, actually, all the energy was in the commercial sector and the dynamism and the independence, of course, was in the commercial sector. but rta does reach across the whole country. it does reach into the rural areas. it does reach outside of the city. it does reach those populations who are not reached by the commercial media. and i think all media is important, but rta is absolutely key to the future of a country. particularly if it can become more independent. what, as we were talking about this morning, is needed in afghanistan is a national dialogue, is a national public debate. and i think one of the foundation stones for the national dialogue to come is something like, is rta. this is a difficult argument to make, actually. i mean, we support public service broadcasting around the world, and the number of success stories, successful transition of state characters to independent, financially-independent public broadcasters is not a big one. the political price of surrendering control of your state broadcaster by any incumbent president is very, very h
is announcing a $1 billion energy subsidy package. moscow amid worries that was ready to stretch its military rich further into the mainland. your reaction? guest: is a good sign the tangible support. it is important to remember that the united states along with russia and great written in 1994 -- in great britain in 1994 made certain assurances to the ukraine, and russia is now in violation. they need to respond to support ukraine and look for ways to in allies russia until they cease military action. host: president vladimir putin back, but saides that russia reserves the right to protect russians in the country and he accused the u.s. of encouraging an unconstitutional he hopes russia will not need to use force in predominantly russian-speaking eastern ukraine . guest: there is a certain irony there. first of all, president vladimir fled.ch when the agreement was signed, the russian representative refused to witness it. .here is a certain irony it has not been carried out because viktor yanukovych fled to russia. host: let's start with mario in connecticut on the line for democrats. good m
resolutions, cooperates with the international atomic energy agency, respects human rights, and ceases to promote global terrorism. furthermore, the nuclear weapons-free iran act implements president obama's own policy. in his recent state of the union address he stated -- and i quote -- "be the first to call for more sanctions" -- close quote should iran fail to uphold the interim agreement. by passing this legislation we are ensuring that the united states has the ability to further penalize iran for its continued noncompliance. nevertheless, president obama has threatened to veto this legislation, further indicating his willingness to blindly concede to iranian rhetoric. now is not the time for this nation to exhibit weakness. now is our chance to demonstrate to iran and to the world that we are serious about nuclear nonproliferation in compliance with international laws and obligations. for these reasons i strongly support the nuclear weapons-free iran act as presented in this amendment and i urge my colleagues to act swiftly to pass this important measure. mr. president, i yield t
objectives affected by energy issues. while the national debate is over, tubes and mobile biological weapons labs, internal documents note that increased oil production in a post war iraq would have the vul effect of reducing world oil prices. >> prior to our even going to war in iraq, the focus was on oil. and iraqi oil and how to take it over far more than anything else. >> joining me now is rachel maddow, the host of the "the rachel maddow" show and "why we did it." what is the answer after all of your work on this? >> i think, andrea, the question is the most important part, which is the decisions of our generation on national security are determined more than anything by what the george w. bush administration did with that nine-year war in iraq and alongside of the 13-year war in afghanistan that's still going on. the american people are against those wars. those are the determine tif constraint for thinking about everything from crimea to syria to what the overall size of the u.s. military is. if we want avoid those protracted foreign -- we can't make good decisions until we understand
energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about two weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer, worsening prostate symptoms, decreased sperm count, ankle, feet or body swelling, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing while sleeping and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. ask your doctor about a
on exports and direct investment in the russian energy infrastructure and business -- >> you think that's sufficient to back off -- i want to get our other experts in. but so far they're not connected or at least not connected with me. i apologize to the viewers on that. we'll get them on. let me stay with this, benn steil. german's foreign minister has been making unpersuasive sounds in all the reports today. he doesn't seem to want to go along with the drill about preparation for g-8 or not going to the g-8 meeting in sochi. i haven't heard a thing. you ascribe that to natural gas? that's it? >> it's not just natural gas. it's the business that german industrial outfits like siemens are doing within russia. and the russians know very well when they invaded the breakaway georgian republics like south ossetia in 2008, the west did absolutely nothing. so this is playing according to script. >> do we have general mccaffrey? >> i think so. >> i beg your pardon, for whatever snafu we had. let me ask you the question about this 5:00 a.m. deadline and whether russia is going to tell ukraine t
-- of its energy from russia, from russian natural gas. sometimes it goes even higher than that. so they are going to be very reluctant to do the kind of comprehensive sanctions which would deprive them of that energy. and as you point out, london's role as a financial center is dependent upon other things, russia's capital. i think we should push for as comprehensive sanctions as we can get. you're never going to get totally comprehensive sanctions, but they do exact a price. and what we're trying to do here, as i see it, what the united states is trying to do with many members of the international community, make russia pay some price, some significant price, isolate it, and send a signal that this is not how we want business to be conducted in the 21 s century. you're not going to be able to stop it in its tracks. you're not going to be able to send troops into crimea. but the fact that we can't get 100% leak proof sanctions doesn't mean we shouldn't try to raise the bar and exact some price. >> i would like you to listen, fareed, to what the secretary of state, john kerry, said
. this is all because of what's happening in ukraine? >> you have the biggest energy user. we see these spikes in oil when we have tensions rise in the middle east, and then they come back down again when you see those recede. when people talk about trade sanctions, you can see how it could hit the likes of russia. 20% of their national income comes from natural gas alone. so it could hurt them. you have to say, russia is not iran. i was looking at some of the stats from b.p. statistical review. a third of natural gas imports into e.u. come from russia. any kinds of trade sanctions there would hurt russia, and it would hurt europe, too. >> and there are questions raised about what will be the spongs in terms of sanctions, but also what will be the russian response with regard to gas supplies. the gas problem has been suggesting it could end natural gas discounts to ukraine and that could have effects to the rest of europe. >> it would definitely do that. the gas problem today is one of the biggest in the equity market down to almost 10%. they are -- down almost 10%. they are getting hit hard.
missions canceled. naval cooperation talks canceled. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. until the crisis in crimea is further resolved. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? guest: the economic situation in russia may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. this is according to senior officials. they think that the russian ruble will tumble. willinvestment in russia fall. and that this will have a cumulative effect to pushing those who can influence moscow to have a change of calculus. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. putin has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he has to suffer under, he is willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. host: what is the point of all this? from mr. putin's position. guest: for putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. he believes, and many russian
is in the spotlight as the atomic energy agency convenes today in vienna. based struck a temporary deal last year to limit uranium enrichment and are now working on a permanent deal. they are reviewing the response of progress from iran. the organization has said that progress has been made. with us today, a researcher at the international relations research institute here in france. the signals coming out are pretty positive. i might say that they are positive for the first time in years. >> this is no surprise, if you are referring to the agreement in geneva, or just what has been time. for it this >> that has not always been the case. >> it was a breakthrough, yes. >> are you confident that iranian that -- that iranian powers and world powers are moving forward to a deal? >> yes and no. yes in the sense that obviously iran wants to introduce a deal. this important issue is that the supreme leader obviously wants a deal for you renumeration's with the u.s.. >> he does not always sound like it, by the way. >> again, that is why this and holds significance, it is true. but also obviously the u.s.
on their nuclear program. the head of the international atomic energy agency says they're reducing stockpiles of enriched uranium as planned. he addressed a meeting in vienna of the agency's board of governors. he was reporting on the status of an agreement last year between negotiators from iran and six world powers. the iranians agreed to curb their nuclear program in return for a limited easing of sanctions. the deal requires them to dilute some of their stockpile of enriched uranium to make it less suitable for nuclear weapons. amarah credited the iranians for taking a positive step forward but he urged them to clear up suspicions that scientists are pursuing research into nuclear weapons. iran's ambassador said amano's remarks sog iaea officials are satisfied with their efforts. >>> it's going to be raining in tokyo on wednesday. our meteorologist robert speta has more on that. robert? >> yes, gene, what we are seeing is this low pressure system coming in from the west and not only rain showers, but even some snow in the higher elevations, and don't be surprised if you hear a rumble of t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)